ASRock 990FX Motherboard Extreme9 Comes with Support for up to 5GHz Processor Speed

Advance Micro Devices (AMD) has introduced the FX-9590 processor as today’s fastest CPUs. But unfortunately not all motherboards available on the market capable of supporting the performance of the processor. It is also used by ASRock to introduce a new motherboard that supports the processor at speeds up to 5GHz.

The motherboard is ASRock 990FX Extreme9. This motherboard also has to undergo various tests to determine the quality in it. Not only that, this motherboard also has the updated BIOS in order to run the latest processors from AMD.

In some benchmark tests, this motherboard also provides significant performance improvements. In Super P1MB test, the obtained results motherboard 18.377 seconds. Also in PC Mark Vantage test, the results obtained for 18 894, an increase of 15:31 per cent compared to the previous generation of chips.

The motherboard comes with four PCI Express 2.0 x16 slots, four DDR3 memory slots, and SATA 6Gbps ports. This motherboard also comes with a 12 +2 phase power design, Hi-Density Power connector, Dual Stack MOSFET and others.

NUC, Small PC but powerful

A few days later, I was tested the Intel Next Unit of Computing (NUC) that the new board. Even the box is written in Pre-Production Engineering Sample. So still a production example, not yet in production, may not even be sold widely.

If summarized in a few words, then Intel NUC that I use a small computer with the ability of cayenne pepper for approximately 75% of Server Quad Xeon E31220.

Desktop Computer Intel NUC is a very, very small. The size is approximately 11cm x 11cm x 4cm so it can be easily handheld hands. May be quite right if called as handheld computers hehehe …

The outer display is very compact Intel NUC all. It even comes in a hook to stick in the back of a digital TV screen / monitor. Adapter used is ordinary laptop adapter, with a voltage of 19V with 65W power.

For connection to the outside world, Intel NUC equipped with three USB ports. Two USB 2.0 is being a single USB 3.0 so you can perform high-speed data transfer at all. We can include a USB keyboard and mouse to operate the Intel NUC.
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LAN connector used is Gigabit Ethernet. I check using ethtool this device has the ability to auto negotiation 10Mbps / 100Mbps / 1000Mbps full duplex, so very fast.

In Intel NUC body mounted Wifi antenna that can be used for a wireless Internet connection to hotspots.

Gorgeous from Intel NUC is the absence of a VGA connector. That there is a built-in HDMI connector Intel ® High Definition Audio 2 subsystem is configured for 8-channel (7.1) digital audio output via HDMI 1.4a. It means we can use the Digital TV as a monitor with an HDMI connection. For those who still use VGA, can buy a VGA to HDMI adapter and it also goes well.

Intel NUC has two SO-DIMM slots for 1333/1600MHz memory with a capacity of up to 16GB. Intel NUC coincidence that I am trying to use 8GB of memory.
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Hard drive is a hard disk Intel NUC future generations, using a Solid State Drive (SSD) 32GB, so instead of mechanical hard disk is installed using an mSATA connector.

 

SkyDrive Windows 8.1, Download File Without Internet

Washington – After releasing a preview version of Windows 8.1 recently, Microsoft said that the final version will be released in August 2013. Windows 8.1 users will soon be able to access files on a Windows cloud-based storage service, SkyDrive, without having to connect to the Internet.
Microsoft announced that SkyDrive will be accompanied by support for offline access. Through SkyDrive service, users will be able to determine which files can be accessed without connecting to the Internet and then downloaded to the user’s device automatically.
Files that can be accessed offline will be easily identified when the user opens SkyDrive. In addition, Windows 8.1 users can also store files on SkyDrive in offline mode, which then can be directly uploaded when connected to the Internet network.
Tami Reller, Chief Financial Officer said the company’s Windows Windows 8.1 will be completed in August 2013. Reller did not say when the user can install updates to Windows 8.1. But, Reller showed several new features and functionality in Windows 8.1.
Windows 8.1 users will be looking for music that is integrated with Xbox Music and can share web pages into Xbox Music application to create playlists. Another breakthrough designed in Windows 8.1, namely, Miracast. This displays renewal HD video and audio from Wi-Fi to the other views, such as TV. And many more other renewal in Windows 8.1.

Review: First 8-inch Windows tablet is a device that shouldn’t exist

My dissatisfaction with PC OEMs is something I have documented in the past. They offer a confusing array of products and tend to cut corners in the worst ways imaginable. The OEM response to Windows 8 has been to produce a wide range of machines sporting novel form factors to fit all sorts of niches, both real and imagined.

One niche that the OEMs haven’t tried to fill, however, has been sub-10-inch tablets. That’s not altogether surprising. Microsoft designed Windows 8 for screens of 10 inches or more, and initially the operating system’s hardware requirements had a similar constraint.

That decision looked a little short-sighted after the success of tablets such as the Google Nexus 7 and the iPad mini. Accordingly, Microsoft changed the rules in March, opening the door to a range of smaller Windows tablets.

The Acer Iconia W3 is the first—and currently the only—8-inch Windows tablet. That attribute alone makes it in some sense noteworthy. Sadly, it’s about the only thing that does.

Spec-wise, this is another Intel Clover Trail tablet, and its internals are basically the same as the devices that launched last year (such as its bigger brother, the Acer Iconia W510). This means 1.8 GHz, dual core, four thread Intel Atom Z2760 CPU, 2 GB RAM, 64 GB flash storage (which with Acer’s default partitioning leaves a little over 29 GB usable), front and rear cameras, Bluetooth 4.0, and 802.11b/g/n (no 5 GHz support). There’s a micro-HDMI and micro-USB port for external connectivity (a separate cable converts the micro USB port into a full-size one), along with an SD card slot. The tablet has a speaker adequate for notification sounds but little more.

As a result, performance and battery life are similar to what we’ve seen before. The Iconia W3 comes equipped with full-blown Windows 8, unlike ARM tablets, so it can run any 32-bit Windows application—should you really want to. Clover Trail’s GPU performance is such that games and other graphics-intensive programs won’t run well, however.

Eight inches of horror

The new bits on this tablet are really the screen and the size.

Screens are important. We spend essentially all our time interacting with devices looking at screens. Cost-cutting on screens is unforgivable, as a bad screen will damage every single interaction you have with the device. This goes doubly so for tablets, where the screen works not only as an output device but also as the primary input device.

The Acer Iconia W3’s screen is a standout—because it is worst-in-class. I hated every moment I used the Iconia W3, and I hated it because I hated the screen. Its color accuracy and viewing angles are both miserable (whites aren’t white—they’re weirdly colorful and speckled). The screen has a peculiar grainy appearance that makes it look permanently greasy. You can polish as much as you like; it will never go away. The whole effect is reminiscent in some ways of old resistive screens.

It’s hard to overstate just how poor this screen is. At any reasonable tablet viewing distance, the color of the screen is uneven. The viewing angle is so narrow that at typical hand-held distances, the colors change across the width of the screen. At full arm’s length the screen does finally look even, but the device is obviously unusable that way.

Acer has clearly skimped on the screen. I’m sure the panel in the W3 was quite cheap, and that may be somewhat reflected in the unit’s retail price ($379 for a 32GB unit, $429 for this 64GB one—putting it at the same price as the 32GB iPad mini, which has a comparable amount of available disk space), but who cares? It doesn’t matter how cheap something is if you don’t want to use it at all.

This poor screen quality isn’t a question of resolution, either. 1280×800 is not a tremendously high resolution, but text looks crisp enough. At 186 pixels per inch, 1280×800 feels more or less OK for this size of device.

The low resolution does, however, have one significant drawback: it disables Windows 8’s side-by-side Metro multitasking, which requires a resolution of at least 1366×768. The W3’s screen is 86 pixels too narrow, so the Metro environment is strictly one application at a time.

This is an unfortunate decision. The side-by-side multitasking is one of the Metro environment’s most compelling features. Keeping Twitter or Messenger snapped to the side makes a lot of sense and works well. I’ve never used Windows 8 on a device that didn’t support side-by-side Metro multitasking before, and I don’t ever want to again.

Size-wise, the W3 may be small for a Windows tablet, but it’s not exactly small. It’s fat. The W3 is 11.4 mm thick. The iPad mini, in comparison, is 7.2 mm thick. The Iconia W3 is also heavy at 500 g; the iPad mini, in comparison, is 308 g. That makes the W3 more than 50 percent thicker and more than 50 percent heavier.

The thickness makes the lack of a full-sized USB port on the device more than a little confusing. There’s certainly room for a full USB port, and a full port would be more convenient than the dongle. But for whatever reason, Acer didn’t give us one.

The device itself feels solid enough, albeit plasticky. It doesn’t exude quality, but it’s a step or two up from the bargain basement.

Keyboard non-dock

The W3 also has a keyboard accessory. As is common for this kind of thing, the keyboard has no electrical connection to the tablet. It’s a Bluetooth keyboard powered by a pair of AAA batteries. It has a groove along the top that can hold the tablet in both landscape and portrait orientations and a clip on the back that lets you use the keyboard as a kind of screen protector.

The keyboard has to be manually paired to the tablet. It’s more or less full-size, with a reasonable key layout. It’s a typical mediocre keyboard. The feel is a little on the squishy side, lacking the crispness of, for example Microsoft’s Type Cover for its Surface tablets. It’s better than any on-screen keyboard, and to that extent it does its job. But it’s a long way from being an actually good keyboard.

The groove does hold the tablet up, and on a level surface the unit doesn’t topple over, but it’s not as satisfactory as some of the hinged keyboard/docks we’ve seen on other devices. Tilt the base while carrying it or using it on your lap and the tablet is liable to fall out.

Microsoft still has ‘a way to go’ in determining its market for Windows 8, says Network Rail

Microsoft has “a bit of a way to go” in determining which market it is targeting for Windows 8, even though the operating system has now been on the market for over a year, Network Rail’s head of information systems strategy Simon Goodman has told Computing.

Goodman praised Microsoft’s early entries into hybrid-led technology via Windows 8, saying there was definitely “a need” for hybrid notebook-tablets, and that this was something Network Rail had “explored internally”.

“We’ve already looked at Surface-based devices,” confirmed Goodman.

“It gives you a combination of nice tablet looks and feel, a lightweight device, but it’s got a bit of grunt behind it, so if you need to do something a little bit more hefty from an applications perspective, you’ve got the tools and capabilities to do that,” he said.

But Goodman described the move from Windows 7 to 8, with its added Modern apps interface, as “a huge jump” for Microsoft, which could affect ease of adoption for some of Network Rail’s workers.

“If you’re a traditional desktop user, it’s quite difficult to get to the look and feel of how that works, and how to navigate around it,” said Goodman.

But Goodman maintained that, from a tablet perspective, “it’s not that hard to work out where you go, and everything else”.

However, Goodman is going to hold fire before rolling out any Windows 8 systems en masse at Network Rail.

“For me, it’s something we will look to embrace where it makes sense to do so, but I still think Microsoft has got a bit of a way to go yet to determine exactly what market it wants to play into,” said Goodman.

Look out for the full-length video interview with Network Rail’s Simon Goodman on Computing very soon.

Windows 7 Losing Steam in the Enterprise but Microsoft Holds Steady

While still the most popular operating system in the enterprise, including at midsize businesses, Microsoft Windows 7’s reality in this new age of business computing is that it is slowly losing market share. Mobile operating systems, like Android and iOS, and even Mac OS are quickly making inroads, largely driven by BYOD policies implemented by IT departments in the last few years.

Even with Windows 7 losing market share, Microsoft still rules the roost, however, as an overall analysis of current computer platform use at the enterprise revealed in late April at CITEWorld. Some businesses still use Windows XP. These companies still using XP need to take note that Microsoft is discontinuing support for the OS in April 2014.

Windows 8 Still to Come for the Midsize Business

In contrast to the leadership status held by Windows 7, Microsoft’s new OS, Windows 8, is making small inroads at the corporate level. Many midsize businesses appear hesitant to adopt 8, due to concerns about the usability of and training issues involved in rolling out the new tile-based operating system. Expect the next version of Windows to take steps to improve usability, including returning the Start button, and possibly offering an option to boot-up to the classic Desktop, instead of the newer Metro interface screen.

The CITEWorld article analyzes statistics revealed in a Forrest Research report on the growing operating system diversity at the enterprise. One statistic that perfectly illustrates the migration to alternate operating systems shows that while 67 percent of all computing devices were powered by a version of Windows in 2008, today 70 percent use alternatives. Of course, the rapid growth of mobile devices at the workplace played a major role in the increased diversity.

The Midsize Business Needs to Embrace Operating System Diversity

Even with Windows 7 losing market share, it is still a very popular OS at the midsize business. If the next version of Windows improves some of the issues with Windows 8, Microsoft will continue to maintain a role in business computing. Still, functional alternatives to Redmond exist and need to be considered at enterprises of all sizes.

A forward-thinking midsize business needs to allow for diversity in operating system choice, especially when considering mobile devices. As Cloud computing continues to grow in importance, hybrid tablet/notebook computers allow employees access to their work from home. A BYOD policy needs to consider this type of use, as it allows for improved efficiency as well as a potentially better work-life balance for employees. IT executives responsible for operating system choice at the midsize business need to realize that the days of one dominant operating system are over.

Windows 8.1 Enterprise Preview Reflects the Growing Trend of Working Remotely

Microsoft unleashed Windows 8.1 Enterprise Preview today. The early look at the enterprise version of Windows 8.1 follows the release of Windows 8.1 Preview at Microsoft’s BUILD conference last month, and includes a variety of tools that show Microsoft’s commitment to both BYOD and virtualization.

Aside from the slew of changes and enhancements in the regular Windows 8.1 Preview edition, Windows 8.1 Enterprise Preview also includes features uniquely designed for business customers. Windows 8.1 Enterprise Preview adds business-friendly elements like Direct Acess, and BranchCache. It also provides IT admins with the power to configure and lock down the Start screen on Windows 8 clients.

Microsoft also has tools in Windows 8.1 Enterprise Preview to help out with BYOD and virtualization: Windows To Go, and Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI). Windows To Go lets the company put an entire managed Windows 8 desktop environment on a bootable USB thumb drive, and VDI gives the business the tools to enable users to use critical business software from virtually any Internet-connected device.

One of the hottest trends in business technology today is mobility and working remotely. The driving forces behind working remotely are the “bring your own device” (BYOD) trend and virtualization.

More and more companies are embracing BYOD and allowing (or requiring) employees to provide their own PCs and mobile devices. BYOD can be a cost-cutting measure for the company, because the employee is taking on some (or all) of the burden of purchasing the PC. BYOD enables users to be more productive and have higher job satisfaction because they get to use the hardware they prefer, and are more comfortable with.

BYOD also introduces some unique concerns, though, when it comes to enforcing policies and protecting company data. Regardless of its benefits, companies can’t just let employees connect rogue computers to the network, or store sensitive company data on a personal PC without any protection. The nice thing about Windows To Go is that it turns any Windows 7 or Windows 8 device into a managed Windows 8 PC without installing any additional software, or putting the personal applications or data of the employee at risk.

Another factor in working remotely is virtualization. Whether hosted locally or in the cloud,virtual servers allow the company to maximize the value from its investment in hardware, and adapt quickly to changing demand or business needs. From an endpoint perspective, virtual applications, or virtual desktop are more valuable. A virtual desktop infrastructure like in Windows 8.1 Enterprise simplifies deployment and management of software because the company only has to install and maintain it in one place. At the same time, it helps the users get more done even on older or weaker hardware because much of the processing overhead is handled on the server end.

Small and medium businesses have a lot to gain from both BYOD and virtualization. The features and capabilities of Windows 8.1 Enterprise Preview demonstrate Microsoft’s commitment to keeping SMB customers on the cutting edge.

Not to be outdone, Ready to Introduce Huawei K3V3 Octa Core Processor newest

MediaTek has just introduced its newest processor Octa Core MT6592. And as same-same company based in China, Huawei did not want to miss. An anonymous source who claimed close to Huawei Huawei revealed that the party has completed the development of the Octa core processors.

The source said that the latest generation K3V3 processor has the ability to run in high temperatures as well as cooling the components inside. By doing so, this processor also increases the standby time of the device.

Previously, CEO of Huawei, Richard Yu said that they will soon introduce the latest K3V3 Octa core processors in the second half of 2013.

Yu said that the processor will have a speed of 1.8GHz and a Mali GPU with 28nm technology in the manufacturing process. This processor is also a processor based on the ARM Cortex A15 architecture.

Logitech Z600, Speaker Bluetooth To Work Desk

Neat work desk often improve the mood to work and be creative. Workbench clutter usually found in the form of an intricate and difficult cable neatly.
Logitech Z600 Logitech Z600 Bluetooth 1, Bluetooth Speaker For Job news desk computer computer accessories computer
Logitech Z600, Speaker Bluetooth To Work Desk
With the Logitech Z600, at least one of the two wires that disappear at your desk. Armed with a Bluetooth connection, stereo speakers can be connected to a laptop, desktop PCs, tablets, and smartphones. You can connect to three devices at once. Clever, these speakers can also be used in devices with the old Bluetooth profiles that do not support audio streaming.
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Logitech Z600, Speaker Bluetooth To Work Desk
Z600 has been equipped with three drivers in each unit. At the top of the right speaker, available touch panel to adjust the volume. You just swiping a finger to increase or slow down the sound. Also available is a 3.5 mm audio jack for connecting non-Bluetooth devices such as the iPod nano or iPod Shuffle.
Logitech Z600 Logitech Z600 Bluetooth 4, Bluetooth Speaker For Job news desk computer computer accessories computer
Logitech Z600, Speaker Bluetooth To Work Desk
Logitech Bluetooth Speakers Z600 will be available in the UK and the United States began in August. The price is estimated at Rp 1.8 million. Currently no information when these speakers will be present in Indonesia.

Linksys X3500 Provide Two Line Internet

Home computer network equipment manufacturers Linksys launches Wi-Fi modem router X3500 series in Jakarta, Wednesday (17/07/2013). This product is equipped with dual band capability, at a frequency of 2.4 GHz and 5GHz, which can be run simultaneously at speeds up to 450Mbps + 300Mbps.

Networking Linksys Indonesia Sales Manager, Kevin Kurniawan said, X3500 products provide two interface internet connection, ie ADSL and WAN.

ADSL ports by default has been available in the X3500, so the ADSL internet cable from the provider, such as Telkom Speedy, can be directly used. As for cable modem subscribers, such as First Media, or who already have ADSL modem, can use the WAN port on the X3500.

It also provides a modem router 4 LAN ports and a USB port that can be used to share content with an external hard disk or connect to the printer. With this, the X3500 can connect the computer to the mobile device, tablet, television, and so on.

“If the user has the flash drive already contains a song or video, then plugged into the router, users can stream from a smartphone or tablet via the DLNA network,” said Kevin.

Linksys offers Cisco Connect Express mobile app for iOS and Android devices, which can be used for remote management, monitoring, and firmware upgrades.

X3500 modem router, which target the middle to upper market segment, has begun to be marketed in Indonesia at a price of Rp 1.7 million.

Although Belkin Linksys was acquired in March 2013 by then, but still retain Linksys Cisco logo at the top of the X3500. According to Kevin, Linksys Networking Indonesia still protect products with warranty and after sales service.