SkyDrive Windows 8.1, Download File Without Internet

Washington – After releasing a preview version of Windows 8.1 recently, Microsoft said that the final version will be released in August 2013. Windows 8.1 users will soon be able to access files on a Windows cloud-based storage service, SkyDrive, without having to connect to the Internet.
Microsoft announced that SkyDrive will be accompanied by support for offline access. Through SkyDrive service, users will be able to determine which files can be accessed without connecting to the Internet and then downloaded to the user’s device automatically.
Files that can be accessed offline will be easily identified when the user opens SkyDrive. In addition, Windows 8.1 users can also store files on SkyDrive in offline mode, which then can be directly uploaded when connected to the Internet network.
Tami Reller, Chief Financial Officer said the company’s Windows Windows 8.1 will be completed in August 2013. Reller did not say when the user can install updates to Windows 8.1. But, Reller showed several new features and functionality in Windows 8.1.
Windows 8.1 users will be looking for music that is integrated with Xbox Music and can share web pages into Xbox Music application to create playlists. Another breakthrough designed in Windows 8.1, namely, Miracast. This displays renewal HD video and audio from Wi-Fi to the other views, such as TV. And many more other renewal in Windows 8.1.

Review: First 8-inch Windows tablet is a device that shouldn’t exist

My dissatisfaction with PC OEMs is something I have documented in the past. They offer a confusing array of products and tend to cut corners in the worst ways imaginable. The OEM response to Windows 8 has been to produce a wide range of machines sporting novel form factors to fit all sorts of niches, both real and imagined.

One niche that the OEMs haven’t tried to fill, however, has been sub-10-inch tablets. That’s not altogether surprising. Microsoft designed Windows 8 for screens of 10 inches or more, and initially the operating system’s hardware requirements had a similar constraint.

That decision looked a little short-sighted after the success of tablets such as the Google Nexus 7 and the iPad mini. Accordingly, Microsoft changed the rules in March, opening the door to a range of smaller Windows tablets.

The Acer Iconia W3 is the first—and currently the only—8-inch Windows tablet. That attribute alone makes it in some sense noteworthy. Sadly, it’s about the only thing that does.

Spec-wise, this is another Intel Clover Trail tablet, and its internals are basically the same as the devices that launched last year (such as its bigger brother, the Acer Iconia W510). This means 1.8 GHz, dual core, four thread Intel Atom Z2760 CPU, 2 GB RAM, 64 GB flash storage (which with Acer’s default partitioning leaves a little over 29 GB usable), front and rear cameras, Bluetooth 4.0, and 802.11b/g/n (no 5 GHz support). There’s a micro-HDMI and micro-USB port for external connectivity (a separate cable converts the micro USB port into a full-size one), along with an SD card slot. The tablet has a speaker adequate for notification sounds but little more.

As a result, performance and battery life are similar to what we’ve seen before. The Iconia W3 comes equipped with full-blown Windows 8, unlike ARM tablets, so it can run any 32-bit Windows application—should you really want to. Clover Trail’s GPU performance is such that games and other graphics-intensive programs won’t run well, however.

Eight inches of horror

The new bits on this tablet are really the screen and the size.

Screens are important. We spend essentially all our time interacting with devices looking at screens. Cost-cutting on screens is unforgivable, as a bad screen will damage every single interaction you have with the device. This goes doubly so for tablets, where the screen works not only as an output device but also as the primary input device.

The Acer Iconia W3’s screen is a standout—because it is worst-in-class. I hated every moment I used the Iconia W3, and I hated it because I hated the screen. Its color accuracy and viewing angles are both miserable (whites aren’t white—they’re weirdly colorful and speckled). The screen has a peculiar grainy appearance that makes it look permanently greasy. You can polish as much as you like; it will never go away. The whole effect is reminiscent in some ways of old resistive screens.

It’s hard to overstate just how poor this screen is. At any reasonable tablet viewing distance, the color of the screen is uneven. The viewing angle is so narrow that at typical hand-held distances, the colors change across the width of the screen. At full arm’s length the screen does finally look even, but the device is obviously unusable that way.

Acer has clearly skimped on the screen. I’m sure the panel in the W3 was quite cheap, and that may be somewhat reflected in the unit’s retail price ($379 for a 32GB unit, $429 for this 64GB one—putting it at the same price as the 32GB iPad mini, which has a comparable amount of available disk space), but who cares? It doesn’t matter how cheap something is if you don’t want to use it at all.

This poor screen quality isn’t a question of resolution, either. 1280×800 is not a tremendously high resolution, but text looks crisp enough. At 186 pixels per inch, 1280×800 feels more or less OK for this size of device.

The low resolution does, however, have one significant drawback: it disables Windows 8’s side-by-side Metro multitasking, which requires a resolution of at least 1366×768. The W3’s screen is 86 pixels too narrow, so the Metro environment is strictly one application at a time.

This is an unfortunate decision. The side-by-side multitasking is one of the Metro environment’s most compelling features. Keeping Twitter or Messenger snapped to the side makes a lot of sense and works well. I’ve never used Windows 8 on a device that didn’t support side-by-side Metro multitasking before, and I don’t ever want to again.

Size-wise, the W3 may be small for a Windows tablet, but it’s not exactly small. It’s fat. The W3 is 11.4 mm thick. The iPad mini, in comparison, is 7.2 mm thick. The Iconia W3 is also heavy at 500 g; the iPad mini, in comparison, is 308 g. That makes the W3 more than 50 percent thicker and more than 50 percent heavier.

The thickness makes the lack of a full-sized USB port on the device more than a little confusing. There’s certainly room for a full USB port, and a full port would be more convenient than the dongle. But for whatever reason, Acer didn’t give us one.

The device itself feels solid enough, albeit plasticky. It doesn’t exude quality, but it’s a step or two up from the bargain basement.

Keyboard non-dock

The W3 also has a keyboard accessory. As is common for this kind of thing, the keyboard has no electrical connection to the tablet. It’s a Bluetooth keyboard powered by a pair of AAA batteries. It has a groove along the top that can hold the tablet in both landscape and portrait orientations and a clip on the back that lets you use the keyboard as a kind of screen protector.

The keyboard has to be manually paired to the tablet. It’s more or less full-size, with a reasonable key layout. It’s a typical mediocre keyboard. The feel is a little on the squishy side, lacking the crispness of, for example Microsoft’s Type Cover for its Surface tablets. It’s better than any on-screen keyboard, and to that extent it does its job. But it’s a long way from being an actually good keyboard.

The groove does hold the tablet up, and on a level surface the unit doesn’t topple over, but it’s not as satisfactory as some of the hinged keyboard/docks we’ve seen on other devices. Tilt the base while carrying it or using it on your lap and the tablet is liable to fall out.

Microsoft still has ‘a way to go’ in determining its market for Windows 8, says Network Rail

Microsoft has “a bit of a way to go” in determining which market it is targeting for Windows 8, even though the operating system has now been on the market for over a year, Network Rail’s head of information systems strategy Simon Goodman has told Computing.

Goodman praised Microsoft’s early entries into hybrid-led technology via Windows 8, saying there was definitely “a need” for hybrid notebook-tablets, and that this was something Network Rail had “explored internally”.

“We’ve already looked at Surface-based devices,” confirmed Goodman.

“It gives you a combination of nice tablet looks and feel, a lightweight device, but it’s got a bit of grunt behind it, so if you need to do something a little bit more hefty from an applications perspective, you’ve got the tools and capabilities to do that,” he said.

But Goodman described the move from Windows 7 to 8, with its added Modern apps interface, as “a huge jump” for Microsoft, which could affect ease of adoption for some of Network Rail’s workers.

“If you’re a traditional desktop user, it’s quite difficult to get to the look and feel of how that works, and how to navigate around it,” said Goodman.

But Goodman maintained that, from a tablet perspective, “it’s not that hard to work out where you go, and everything else”.

However, Goodman is going to hold fire before rolling out any Windows 8 systems en masse at Network Rail.

“For me, it’s something we will look to embrace where it makes sense to do so, but I still think Microsoft has got a bit of a way to go yet to determine exactly what market it wants to play into,” said Goodman.

Look out for the full-length video interview with Network Rail’s Simon Goodman on Computing very soon.

Windows 7 Losing Steam in the Enterprise but Microsoft Holds Steady

While still the most popular operating system in the enterprise, including at midsize businesses, Microsoft Windows 7’s reality in this new age of business computing is that it is slowly losing market share. Mobile operating systems, like Android and iOS, and even Mac OS are quickly making inroads, largely driven by BYOD policies implemented by IT departments in the last few years.

Even with Windows 7 losing market share, Microsoft still rules the roost, however, as an overall analysis of current computer platform use at the enterprise revealed in late April at CITEWorld. Some businesses still use Windows XP. These companies still using XP need to take note that Microsoft is discontinuing support for the OS in April 2014.

Windows 8 Still to Come for the Midsize Business

In contrast to the leadership status held by Windows 7, Microsoft’s new OS, Windows 8, is making small inroads at the corporate level. Many midsize businesses appear hesitant to adopt 8, due to concerns about the usability of and training issues involved in rolling out the new tile-based operating system. Expect the next version of Windows to take steps to improve usability, including returning the Start button, and possibly offering an option to boot-up to the classic Desktop, instead of the newer Metro interface screen.

The CITEWorld article analyzes statistics revealed in a Forrest Research report on the growing operating system diversity at the enterprise. One statistic that perfectly illustrates the migration to alternate operating systems shows that while 67 percent of all computing devices were powered by a version of Windows in 2008, today 70 percent use alternatives. Of course, the rapid growth of mobile devices at the workplace played a major role in the increased diversity.

The Midsize Business Needs to Embrace Operating System Diversity

Even with Windows 7 losing market share, it is still a very popular OS at the midsize business. If the next version of Windows improves some of the issues with Windows 8, Microsoft will continue to maintain a role in business computing. Still, functional alternatives to Redmond exist and need to be considered at enterprises of all sizes.

A forward-thinking midsize business needs to allow for diversity in operating system choice, especially when considering mobile devices. As Cloud computing continues to grow in importance, hybrid tablet/notebook computers allow employees access to their work from home. A BYOD policy needs to consider this type of use, as it allows for improved efficiency as well as a potentially better work-life balance for employees. IT executives responsible for operating system choice at the midsize business need to realize that the days of one dominant operating system are over.

Windows 8.1 Enterprise Preview Reflects the Growing Trend of Working Remotely

Microsoft unleashed Windows 8.1 Enterprise Preview today. The early look at the enterprise version of Windows 8.1 follows the release of Windows 8.1 Preview at Microsoft’s BUILD conference last month, and includes a variety of tools that show Microsoft’s commitment to both BYOD and virtualization.

Aside from the slew of changes and enhancements in the regular Windows 8.1 Preview edition, Windows 8.1 Enterprise Preview also includes features uniquely designed for business customers. Windows 8.1 Enterprise Preview adds business-friendly elements like Direct Acess, and BranchCache. It also provides IT admins with the power to configure and lock down the Start screen on Windows 8 clients.

Microsoft also has tools in Windows 8.1 Enterprise Preview to help out with BYOD and virtualization: Windows To Go, and Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI). Windows To Go lets the company put an entire managed Windows 8 desktop environment on a bootable USB thumb drive, and VDI gives the business the tools to enable users to use critical business software from virtually any Internet-connected device.

One of the hottest trends in business technology today is mobility and working remotely. The driving forces behind working remotely are the “bring your own device” (BYOD) trend and virtualization.

More and more companies are embracing BYOD and allowing (or requiring) employees to provide their own PCs and mobile devices. BYOD can be a cost-cutting measure for the company, because the employee is taking on some (or all) of the burden of purchasing the PC. BYOD enables users to be more productive and have higher job satisfaction because they get to use the hardware they prefer, and are more comfortable with.

BYOD also introduces some unique concerns, though, when it comes to enforcing policies and protecting company data. Regardless of its benefits, companies can’t just let employees connect rogue computers to the network, or store sensitive company data on a personal PC without any protection. The nice thing about Windows To Go is that it turns any Windows 7 or Windows 8 device into a managed Windows 8 PC without installing any additional software, or putting the personal applications or data of the employee at risk.

Another factor in working remotely is virtualization. Whether hosted locally or in the cloud,virtual servers allow the company to maximize the value from its investment in hardware, and adapt quickly to changing demand or business needs. From an endpoint perspective, virtual applications, or virtual desktop are more valuable. A virtual desktop infrastructure like in Windows 8.1 Enterprise simplifies deployment and management of software because the company only has to install and maintain it in one place. At the same time, it helps the users get more done even on older or weaker hardware because much of the processing overhead is handled on the server end.

Small and medium businesses have a lot to gain from both BYOD and virtualization. The features and capabilities of Windows 8.1 Enterprise Preview demonstrate Microsoft’s commitment to keeping SMB customers on the cutting edge.

Apple Develops Technology ‘Voice Recognition’ Alone for Siri

Apple is reportedly developing a voice recognition technology for Siri. Through a team that was formed recently, Apple seems to want to remove the dependency from Nuance.
As a reminder, Nuance Communications is a multinational software maker based in Boston, USA. The company makes software used by voice recognition Siri. Later revealed that the two researchers, Nuance has now joined Apple.
Reporting from Xconomy, which was formed in Boston team consists of former employees of Nuance Gunnar Evermann with experience in developing voice recognition technology, then Larry Gillick, who served as “Chief Scientlist Speech” in Apple Siri, and Don McAllestar a former employee who is now Nuance served as “Senior Reseach Scientist” at Apple. There are also several other former employees who now joins Nuance with Apple but are not based in Boston, including Caroline Labrecque and Rongqing Huang.

New Release, New Nexus 7 Already Earn 2 Update Software

Having announced a few days ago, 7 of the Google Nexus tablet could have ordered via the Play Store. Opening the pre-order was first announced via Twitter. Google Play Store opened bookings for the new Nexus 7 16GB and 32GB. Both are offered at a price of USD 229 and USD 269.
Almost simultaneously with the opening of pre-orders, it also gives Google Nexus 7, this new software update. There are 2 updates are given, with the first update will be automatically downloaded to the tablet when connected to the Internet for the first time during initial setup.
As for the second update will be downloaded automatically when the tablet is used several times. The update notification will appear when it’s finished downloading and is ready to be installed. So make sure that the type of connection used unlimited when activating new Nexus 7 so as not to run out of quota.

Site developer “software” Apple hacked

Computer and software giant Apple on Monday AM, said its software developer page has been offline after hacked. Apple warns that personal information regarding users may have been stolen.

“Last Thursday, an intruder tried to break into the personal information of our registered developers on our developer page,” Apple said as quoted by AFP.

Despite the sensitive information is encrypted, “we can not rule out the possibility that some of the names, mailing addresses and email addresses belonging to the developer or may have been accessed.”

The information technology giant said in a statement titled “We’ll be right back” that hackers have hacked the reason “for the sake of transparency and accountability.”

Company officials immediately blocked sites is Thursday U.S. time ago and has since worked to fix it.

“To prevent this kind of security threats happening again, we will thoroughly examine our development system, software update our server, and to rebuild kesuluruhan our database,” said Apple, apologize and hope that the developer’s site soon recover.

This site is a portal to the creators of third-party software to design applications for the iPhone, iPad and Mac computers, in addition to being a forum for software developers.

According to Macworld, for days many developers have posted a message pitched frustration and anger on Twitter about the breakdown of the site.

Software for Smooth Action Plow Car Found

New York – Hacking a car is not a new field, but the secret of ‘success’ steal grounded sophisticated control of the car during the closed meeting. recently, two peratas successfully decode software commonly used among others by car thieves to disable siatem safety and escape easily incarannya car.

Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek, the two hackers, said they would publish details of engineering blueprint to attack the security system in the Toyota Prius and Ford Escape. This 100-page findings compiled after several months of research they conducted with a grant from the U.S. government Sserikat.

Two “white hats” – the nickname for hackers who try to uncover software vulnerabilities before criminals can exploit them – also will release software that they built for hacking a car in a hacker convention in Las Vegas this week.

They say they found a way to force Toyota Prius brake suddenly at a speed of 80 miles per hour, determine the direction of the steering wheel, to speed up the machine. They also say that they can disable the brakes of the Ford Escape at very slow speeds, so the car continued to move no matter how hard the driver depresses the pedal.

Both men said they hope the data they publish will encourage other white hat hackers to uncover security flaws more advanced automotive products that can be fixed.

“I believe the 100 eyes of security researchers more powerful than the eyes that are in Ford and Toyota,” said Miller, a well-known security expert who was formerly known Twitter reveals burglary of Apple Inc. App Store.

Toyota Motor Corp. spokesman John Hanson said the company is reviewing its security systems car after referring to their findings. He said the automaker to invest in electronic security, although they acknowledge hackers continue to find loopholes.

“It is impossible to do,” said Hanson, referring to the newly exposed hacking. “Certainly we take it seriously.”

Being a spokesman for Ford Motor Co., Craig Daitch, said the company considers the vehicle electronic security seriously. But he guarantees that the product is now in the hands of consumers is equipped with adequate safeguards.

Keyboard Applications in Cloud Data Store

Jakarta – Manufacturers keyboard application for tablet computers and smart phones, SwiftKey, SwiftKey has launched a beta version of Cloud.
SwiftKey Keyboard is an Android app that can learn the customs and habits of the user typing text to produce a more predictable.
SwiftKey on Cloud services predecessors, all languages ​​stored on the device. Means, if a user loses his phone, having to learn the application SwiftKey typing habits again. With this new service, users can backup files in the cloud and sync with various devices.
SwiftKey Cloud will also integrate the analysis of data from Twitter and other sources to find a new trending topic. Then bring the words that relate to the topic being the trend for users.
Enterprise application that promises enhanced personal words and phrases as well as integrating predictive Gmail and Facebook. This application can be downloaded free.